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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
see the city name down on the lower left, mississippi. the number next to the city is the derivative of the gps marker for this google location and i sort of transposed the numbers and used that. i wanted to connotate that virtual world and also there was a visual connection to the photographic heritage that was pretty wild. on top of this moment in time, there is also a breaking down of the imagery thaps in the google pictures themselves, most of these are lo fi and i chose that i guess because of the esthetics. it did not contain the same look as these and it also erode the truth and makes the lens a little bit blurry, it alters things from a technical point of view. so, you could see these pictures that sort of describe them as drive-by pictures that we are drive-by really captures this and not necessarily immersive in any way. it is literally a car driving by capturing a moment. some of this has been done in the past, walker evans took pictures out of a moving vehicle. in fact, strangely, right upstairs in the library before this talk i was looking through my side and i have on t
to have anita thompson here, from mississippi, because 48 years ago, there were drive-by shootings at headstart programs in her state, and some toloyers were threatening not send their children to headstart. we have come some way, and we have a ways to go. and earlyeadstart childhood education programs were serving a scant 40% of all eligible children. waiting lists or long. -- were long. rising fixed costs and rent, energy. we have almost always operated at the margins because it seems inconceivably -- inconceivable not to spend every available dollar on providing the best quality program for every possible child. when the unthinkable happened and sequestration became the new reality this march, we had little left to cut. you recently saw -- you have likely seen the recent report that over 57,000 fewer children will be served in head start and early head start next year because of the sequester. this is not a small number. numbercrunching thinkers in our team figured out that 57,000 people would fill a football stadium at the university of louisville. they would fill 1900 school m
jackson mississippi, good morning. yes, i am a conservative republican from mississippi. i agree with the doctor earlier. i think obamacare is very bad. it is going to go down naturally. i am not for a government shutdown i am for tying it to and doing asing the conservative republicans will done. i think we ought to way entitlements and electric public and in 2014. i am not for a government shutdown and i am not for obamacare. i am tying it to the debt ceiling. host: that is the strategy as far as speaker boehner is concerned. caller: i think that is what we should do. eastern and central time zones and mountain pacific time zones are the options. the numbers are on your screen, you can call the one that best represents you. for and worth -- foreign affairs released a story in the washington post this morning, talking about a reunion of families on both sides in korea -- calls, this is john from idaho, good morning. i believe that republicans are missing an opportunity right now to win if wehe government and make president obama passed the health care and not give people voucher
i. once we got past 63 and 64 in saint augustine when the mob turned on the press and in mississippi when people like all good got fired by abc because he would not cover -- abc was still running the story, forgive me, that these three civil rights workers were hiding to get attention and he knew that they had been killed. he lost his job over that. i had to pull nelson at and out of a mob in saint augustine to keep them from being enough. a danish reporter got hit in the camera either by a baseball at and knocked his eye socket out. it was ruthless and brutal for the press. press.s the national the written press never quite believed what they saw. to have press conferences at 9:00 in the morning to say what we were going to do and then the demonstrations would start around 1030 and that 1:00, we would tell them what we did, why we did it, and we would answer questions but they would still -- they could not believe that martin luther king was as , as much of aent selfless man that he actually was. >> in 1961, may 20, when we arrived in montgomery during the freedom ride at the greyho
in this effort. >> host: republican line, brookhaven, mississippi. >> caller: yeah, this is mary. i don't like what y'all are doing on this. you are showing security staff, showing security staff. you are showing pictures and everything. expected tell them how to get badges and all kinds of things. i don't think john should be doing this. i wish you would please, please telling this on tv. terrorist watch tv. i'm highly upset. >> host: abcaeight. all right. >> guest: maybe i can give you a little bit of comfort. where i have done today is the 30,000-foot level. much, much more detail that goes into it than what i can't even describe today. rest assured that there is a great deal of security in and around the port and ports around the country. the federal government is doing a good job. it does need funding to continue that effort. >> host: of the information you told us i assume is public information. >> guest: it is. >> host: the role of the coast guard and security. at what point did they come into play? and then once the ship is here, who takes over security at that point? >> guest: securit
the opportunity to stand on the deck of a new bridge over the mississippi river, 16 feet board to go. i could watch this go down the nations greatest river. theas an awesome view. people that we serve know that we need to build the next great bridges and maintain the futures that all americans drive on. we're tremendously honored. we want to hear from our first guest here, congressman bill shuster. he oversees house action on all the transportation including maritime, highway, mass transit, and railroad. obeying hiss is ninth congressional district and has searched on the committee since his first election to congress in 2000 one. welcome. >> thank you very much. great examplet that i can take back to washington as to how the parties can work together. we need a good example. i really appreciate the opportunity to be here. at every state i have been to this is my first visit to wisconsin. penn state is going to prevail this year. i look at a couple of other governors. thosek forward to engagements. it is an opportunity for me to engage with governors. have traveled around the country, seeing
, kansas, massachusetts, maryland, michigan, minnesota, mississippi, montana, new hampshire, new mexico and washington state. >> good for mississippi. >> bill: how about that. unfortunately, there are still too many kids who are suffering from obesity. one in eight preschoolers in the united states is obese according to the cdc. a third of u.s. children and teens and still more than 2/3 of adults. so you know, we're not out of the woods yet but some good news on that front. president obama talked about this last night with jay leno and he gave some credit where i think credit is due. >> obama: to michelle's credit, the let's move initiative that she's been involved with, that has gotten so many folks all around the country doing stuff to help kids exercise and eat right, for the first time in a long time, we've started to see some modest reduction in childhood obesity. [ applause ] >> bill: very important cause that the first lady has taken on. i think she's done a damn good job of it. and she's had people in the white house. she's done videos. you know what? it's working! we just gotta
themselves. >> host: on our line for independents. randy in west point, mississippi. >> caller: good morning! >> host: good morning. >> caller: if the ports in savannah, georgia going to be upgraded for the new tanker ships? thank you. >> guest: the the port of savannah is currently in the process of working in the corp. of engineer and the federal government to deepen the savannah river so it will be able to accommodate larger vessel the project is underway in term of that investment and improvement. similarly in gulf port, mississippi. as you know, that port was significantly impacted by katrina a few years ago. as part of the process of rebuilding and revitallyization of the mississippi coastline there's activity involved in terms of improvements and investment in and around the port or gulf port to both revitalize that community that have devastated by the hurricane, but also importantly to be able to handle the new type of vessel that will be transiting in to the gulf of mexico in a few short years. >> we have about fifteen minutes left with our guest. he's the president and chief execu
, mississippi, at "the advocate," a historically african-american newspaper. but "the advocate" had a history of being firebombed, a fact that worried his mother, so that did not last long. mr. jealous was also the executive director of the national newspapers publishers association, which represents african american focused, owned, and operated newspapers. what may have been his biggest advocacy challenge is how he courted his wife and the struggle to keep her and win her over with little money and a new job in d.c. he succeeded, however, and is married to lia, and the couple have two young children. but at the core of what mr. jealous is speaking about today, yesterday marked the 50th anniversary of the 1963 march on washington. five decades since martin luther king spoke, the nation has its first black president, but still has serious issues for the african-american people, including record incarceration, double digit unemployment, ballot box suppression, and youth violence. the killing of trayvon martin brought back racial concerns to the front pages. questions remain if the naacp, like m
tempore: the gentleman yields. for what purpose does the gentleman from mississippi rise? >> mr. speaker, unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> mr. speaker, i'm not a fan of government mandates, and neither are my constituents in mississippi. but there is one mandate that the people of mississippi sent me to washington with, to repeal, replace, dismantle, delay, and defund obamacare. i have heard from families, small businesses, and hardworking americans across my district who all have the same message -- this law is a train wreck. mr. palazzo: that is why one of my very first votes in congress was to repeal obamacare. that's why i voted to repeal it nearly 40 times over the last three years. that is why i introduce add constitutional amendment to restore the right of the american people to refuse this bad law. that is also why i firmly believe we must defund obamacare in a continuing resolution this body will take up later this year. i believe this is a fight worth fighting for mississippi. and
. mississippi has just the one clinic in jackson. that one, the republicans are fighting to close that one down as well and it seems like they may be close to doing it. in north dakota, same deal. there's one clinic for the whole great big state. this spring republicans passed a law that aims to shut down that one last clinic. in alabama, there are five clinics that provide abortion services. republicans passed laws in the spring that would close three of the five clinics. in virginia, the number of clinics right now is at 20. it's slated to go to four. in north carolina, 16 facilities, republicans passed new restrictions that are expected to close 15 of those. 15 of the 16. so this is before the republican party in north carolina launched its efforts to shut down clinics and this is likely to be after. it is sometimes difficult to explain this larger trend of republicans creating these new impossible to meet demands on abortion clinics. these legal requirements designed to shut clinics down. in the aning a stran ing ing a, imagine what that means. in the specific, when it's happening it seems
out dirt farmers all over the midwest and the mississippi valley handing them one-way tickets to the vehicle city as flint nicknamed itself. the newcomers slept in shacks, tents and railroad cars. earl's family rented a tiny house, all he could afford on his factory pay. after the war earl tried farming again, failed again and returned to flint for good. everett grew up a city boy with no agricultural ambitions. after graduating from high school in 1933, he enlisted in general motors as an apprentice tool and dye maker at 50 cents an hour. the job could disappear in a day. if a supervisor wanted to hire his brother-in-law, he created ap opening by handing a worker a yellow slip, the color of termination. bachelors were laid off while married men with lower seniority kept their jobs. the supervision, they had no control either, everett recalled. you could come in today and have a desk and have a yellow slip on there that said you're all done. on november 12th, three welders conducted a short pro-union sit-down demonstration. in protest, a department in the plant stopped working
-- guest: the idea is that each state is supposed to have one. it is problematic in some seo --mississippi, in some oun -- some states and counties, there may only be one. there are multistate plans, which we haven't mentioned before. the people who designed the law and who wrote it foresaw the chance that in some parts of the country there might not be sufficient competition. there are provisions to have at least one nonprofit of the state plan and one for-profit of the state plan. they are still being implemented now. they are not likely to be rolled out on a national basis, as was the original intention. --t there are other backstops they are another backstop intended to bring in more competition into states that may be lacking them. another is the co-ops. the federal government, the law provided large subsidies to set up brand-new insurance companies in some states. typically these are blue states like maryland, california -- guest: they were stopped midstride. they got defunded. guest: so it won't be in every state. but the point is that there may be limits to competition and that is
this morning. sarah thomas, a mother of three from mississippi, on track now to become the first permanent, female nfl official. she's on the field right now, in fact, with new orleans saints, as they go through training camp, honing skills as she awaits that final word that her dreams will finally come true. in those bold black and white stripes, and hair tucked under that black hat, this official looks exactly like every other one on the field. >> watch yourself right here, 17. little tight. little tight. >> reporter: but 39-year-old sarah thomas, a married mother of three, is on the verge of history. >> are you a tomboy? >> i'm a tomboy. yes, but i'm married with two boys. >> reporter: poised to become the first-ever full-time female official for the national football league. >> there's momma. >> 72, you have to come move up on this. put your guard up. >> individually, i'm a female. there's a lot of things that set us apart individually. race, gender. but collectively, we're out there for the same goal. >> reporter: for almost 16 years of officiating grade school, high school and colleg
and great grandfather were lawyers in mississippi and drafted wills for people they said they shouldn't draft wills for, shouldn't go in those african-american houses and draft wills for them. it helped me understand, my skin may ab different color but we're all part of the human race. we've got to do better. my god, i've been so touched by everything this weekend it's indescribable. >> you absolutely set the table for us here. i appreciate how generous you've been with your intergenerational study, that we're always standing here with our parents and our children. and that you have lost your child is unspeakable. that you are here together and you are continuing to parent him, despite his loss, is extraordinary. i appreciate you continue thoug >> right. >> thank you. >> thank you very much. >> thank you, very, very kch. >> thank you all for being here and for sharing every part of your story. >>> up next, my father shares his memory of the march on washington with me and the moment he will never forget. we'll be right back. for a strong bag that grips the can... get glad forceflex. s
, mississippi, marie, democratic caller in mississippi. the future of the democratic arty at this point, hiller -- hillary clinton is the sole standing. who she will take with her, that is questionable. she does not have much of a selection to choose from. after listening to her speech at the bar, it just reminded everyone how skilled she is. she is a lawyer. she understands constitutional law in this country as well as the national law. she's the best qualified in able to skills of being negotiate. it is the travesty of what happened in benghazi that i think it was very unprofessional and very undemocratic how the republican party tried to paint it is a very dangerous thing. some people do not want to have a military state in terms of how they run the embassies. it's very unfortunate that it but that is how the international goes. sabotaging the voting rights act, sabotaging the affordable health care act, making it look like something that it is when it isn't, everyone should be able to have health care. i don't know how many people can remember, but there was a time when you could not he den
by the church in philadelphia, mississippi, a worker from boston was beaten to death. the day of this demonstration we have six people shot in washington the same day. black americans right now, young people, we lose 3000 every six months. we have a 9/11 every six months. over 4000 died in 40 years of lynching. we could lose more than that in one year. the priorities that we have are not racism. just because i say that i need tires for my car, my mother gots heart surgery, we have to establish priorities. because i spend my resources helping my mother does not mean i do not need tires. the challenge we face is we are going to give voice to the least of all its children as a measure of our effectiveness and leadership? [applause] the answers will come by going sufferingommunities of problem, and finding out not from the 70% of the households that are raising children, dropping out, but what is happening in the 30% of the households of the people who are not dropping out of school, in jail, on drugs. we just rolled a young lady in going toin teske, college, and for years she has
built a new peline that feeds the jynt wrb refinery near st. louis across the mississippi river and to the refinery. all they have to do is double up on that pipeline, ship the oil down. might cost more in the long run but who know what is they're paying for land leases to the gulf coast. so it's a way to get around the problem. the right of way is already there. you never hear anybody mention it. host: a couple of international stories for you. from the financial times this morning, host: john from boston, massachusetts. caller: i've been watching for a while, what i've learned about politics is sometimes we have a problem i think in this country it's not so much the country any more it has become love of party. i've been watching and no matter what politician you look at in the united states, no matter state or federal, it's become love of party. and where -- they represent the people.shouldn't they doing the for the people? host: doug from springfield. good morning. caller: good morning. my question would be i appreciate you guys and everything you do. i would like some answe
in mississippi. an instructor and student made a jump saturday and disappeared. they were found hours later in a remote swamp. >>> a new picture of n.s.a. leaker edward snowden leaving russia. he was granted temporary asylum and is leaving with other ex-patriots. this while president obama says he will not meet with russian president putin for a one on one unless the situation changes. thoeup -- >>tucker: a scene out of a cops and robber movies. swat members stormed an animal shelter to shoot and kill gill -- giggles. >>steve: was it necessary to kill giggles or is this an example of excessive force in a government gone wild? ray shelby was taking care of giggles and witnessed the incident. he joins us live from chicago. good morning to you. >> good morning. >>steve: why did you have this white-tailed deer at the shelter? apparently you do need to have permits. otherwise it's illegal to keep him. >> a family from illinois brought the deer up because they were -- the deer had been in their backyard for like three days, and they didn't see the mother, so they knew we were there. the shelter i
:00 eastern time, 6:00 local time. robert is joining us, oxford, mississippi, independent line. turning back to the situation in egypt, 421 dead. your thoughts. caller: i want to throw in after hearing dave from texas, but i lived in cairo this past fall as a student. i wanted to say that the completelyere are spotless in comparison to the politics here. in regards to deception of the public, deception of the western media. a few minutesller ago, i have to agree with him, the muslim brotherhood is definitely trying to turn the western eye against the military. from what i can see when i was there, the reason -- there are a lot of deaths now, the muslim brotherhood are using force and are dying because of it because the military are defending themselves, but their were much fewer deaths earlier last fall because there protesters wanted democracy and there were peaceful process. the muslim brotherhood was using force. it looks bad for the military. that is my opinion. host: two were for the call. "usa today: egypt iraq than chaos. "washington times," one us in our generals to cairo? bestca's t
at birmingham and mobs in mississippi. they sat down at lunch counters so others could stand up. they marched and they organized. remember dr. king did march from selma to montgomery -- he didn't speak by himself, he didn't -- there were thousands marching with him and before him and thousands more that did the dirty work that precede it had march. the successful strategies were litigation, organization, mobilization, and coalition. all aimed at creating a national constituency for civil rights. sometimes it is the simplest of these. >> another civil rights icon, president, founder of rain bo push coalition, the reverend esse l. jackson, sr. >> today we appeal to have mercy upon our plee. i was blessed to be here 50 years ago. thank god for the journey, 50 years of tragedy and try umple. there was blood in the amplete we marched in 63. i was with him and a band of warriors as he felt the agony of the might mare approaching in memphis. the pendulum swung between hope and hopelessness, he celebrated the joy of our progress, the freedom from barberism and the right to vote. lebrate the joy of pr
to the summer of 1955 to the killing of emma ll. a 14-year-old african-american boy, and went to mississippi to be with an spawn uncle and cousin and is lynched. dragged out of the bed in the middle of the night by a white bomb and -- mob and ends up in the body of the river. when emma's body was found, -- emmett was 14, she was 14 when she dee integrated the central high school in, a. but emmett, when his body was sent back to chicago, his mother, maimy till, wasn't an activist, she was forced into this. losing her only child. she said she wanted the casket open for the wake and the funeral. she wanted the world to see the ravages of racism. the brutality of big industry. thousands streamed by his casket and saw, and then jet magazine, another black publication, took photographed of the disextendded, mutilated head, and they were published and seared into the history and consciousness of this country. she had something very important to teach the press. show the pictures. show the images. cue imagine if for just one week we saw the images of war, every newspaper had a picture of a dead baby
of frank sinatra. ms. cel-- mississippi kelley's most recent book, "capturing camelot." very well photographed, obviously, and very well put together. personally, these picture books mean a lot more to me when the captions are well researched and thought out and a bit more prose than you would normally find which is what ms. kelley did with this book. never failing to raise a few eyebrows while uncovering stories and doing such a wonderfully painful job of reminding us our heroes are very, very human, please welcome to the festival kitty kelley. [applause] >> the only part of that introduction that isn't quite right is the prolific. it takes me four years -- >> i heard it from someone. >> no, you've got to be careful. [laughter] prolific as a turtle. it takes me four years usually on each book. but this one, this book was a labor of love because stanley tretick was one of my very best friends, and he was one of president kennedy's favorite photographers. and i used to go visit stanley in washington. and one time i asked him what he had in the marine corps locker that he used as hi
history. just last week had had the opportunity to stand on the deck of a new bridge over the mississippi river, 16 feet board to go. i could watch this go down the nations greatest river. it was an awesome view. the people that we serve know that we need to build the next great bridges and maintain the futures that all americans drive on. we're tremendously honored. we want to hear from our first guest here, congressman bill shuster. he oversees house action on all the transportation including maritime, highway, mass transit, and railroad. he represents is obeying his ninth congressional district and has searched on the committee since his first election to congress in 2000 one. welcome. >> thank you very much. thanks for that great example that i can take back to washington as to how the parties can work together. we need a good example. i really appreciate the opportunity to be here. at every state i have been to this is my first visit to wisconsin. penn state is going to prevail this year. i look at a couple of other governors. we look forward to those engagements. it is an opportunit
. in georgia and mississippi. we are fighting the sheriff's i elected officials, the people that in a way they believe think were fighting america. then the largest crowd ever assembled in this country to that time came together. we are america. this coming started we have to come together again because, well, substitute the tea party, the brothers, goldman sachs, corporations for the sheriffs and the policemen in the south. look what they're doing to america today. that's why we have to get together again. voting rights is under attack. we have the "stand your ground." whose ground? the regreggives, i like that word and the racists want us to believe it's their ground. but it's not. it's everybody's ground. what they want is to legalize the right to shoot somebody and kill somebody because their skin color might be, to them, suspicious. [inaudible] we used to call that lynching. the "stand your ground" laws are new pro-lynch laws. why is all of this happening? i believe it's happening because the corporations, the people that are running the businesses today want to treat workers however
told me the problem is katrina, dpus starve, rita, ike, the mississippi oil spill. recently tropical storm isaac last year. so some of the operation concerns that we have. if you said how will which evacuate half of our coastline in a 38-hour period i know who to go to. i know how long it will take. how many hospitals you have in your, in your resbek tiff communities, in your state. how many of you expect will be evacuated or not. how many can help themselves. how many will need the state's assistance. how many of those will need federal assistance, i can tell you. today i just, even last night i was talking to some of my colleagues here too, all of sudden i find myself not, coming up with many so words or anxious about what i was saying to you, as policymakers. and i find that, we are asking for your help to add advocate for dollars to be to be returned because of things that i know, in terms of operations. you know i can tell just from american red cross has a 23 square foot per person, when we come up with capacity numbers, for a building. that is slowly been increasing as recomme
of the mississippi is brewed here in milwaukee. i am appreciative of that. note, in addition to wishing all of you safe travels, most of you will fly out of general mitchell international airport which is just a few minutes down the way. i will be departing to go just a couple minutes south of that. a suburb of milwaukee. on august 5 of last year, a year from tomorrow, we lost lives at that sikh temple and today we will be memorializing those six lives. i appreciate those who reached out, i appreciate that. but we are not just going to be met -- remembering the lives of our loss. in a real sense, we will be celebrating the unity i saw not just from the members of that temple but the larger camepolitan community that together and supported them. the shining example they have wisconsinll of us in -- the old adage that martin luther king did, hatred does not drive out hatred, only love does. we certainly saw that in the sikh community and they inspired us all. we will depart -- will be departing for that in a little bit. >> i am pleased if you could pass on to your whole team of volunteers and everyo
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)

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